Discover the MSc in Sports Industry Management of emlyon

Prepare to become a future leader in the sports industry. Taking in the specific recruitment needs and dynamics of the sports business, emlyon business school has crafted a Master program by combining their expertise in international management with the market experience of some of the world leading sports companies. 

The MSc in Sports Industry Management in Paris & Shanghai helps young talents develop a fine-tuned comprehension of the international sports business, aspiring to shape future leaders with expertise knowledge and an understanding of the sports economic culture.

Be part of a  business school with a sports business orientated outlook

„The sports business has developed to a massive and fast growing market with very specific cultures and codes. Companies and Institutions need to recruit employees and managers capable of adjusting to the industry specificities rapidly. For candidates, this means that the significance of contributing while understanding and adapting to the unique industry strategies is key.“

Andy Gugenheimer, CEO of Headhunting Agency AG Sport Consulting

Schools that want to provide the kind of graduates to fulfil these requirements need to ask themselves: What does a company look for and which skills does an employee need to bring to further develop the industry?

The best way to figure out the answer is working closely with the industry. The program of the Msc in Sports Industry Management of emlyon business school is grounded on a close collaboration with companies like adidas, Eider, Millet, Patagonia, Petzl, Salomon, The North Face, Wilson and co. Thus providing a well-organized program to prepare their students for a career in the sports business. 

This way, students get the chance to get to know key representatives of the sports world through conferences and expert panels, but also already contribute to and learn directly from the industry through business cases and group projects. 

Great job outlooks after graduation

Graduates often face the problem of not finding a position in their specialised field due to missing work experience or network. Thanks to its closeness to the business, as well as providing practical experience through projects and internship possibilities, that’s a reduced risk when studying at emlyon.  According to a survey in 2017,  95% of emlyon’s alumni have started a job in sports less than 6 months after the end of the program. 

„The MSc in Sporty Industry Management prepares students to be leaders and innovators in the industry - not just marketing roles“ says Antoine Haincourt, Head of the Program, „It will help them obtain positions in upper management that lead the industry to new depths.“ 

Specificially, graduates of the MSc in Sports Industry Management have found  jobs in

  • marketing
  • business & development,
  • global management projects
  • consulting
  • supplies & logistics

and others in companies including Decathlon, KPMG, Puma, Nike, Amer Sport, Vente-privée.com, Oxylane, Hi-Tech Sports, Reusch International, Olympique Lyonnais football club and Salomon.

The school’s been recognised as one number 3 of the best business schools in France in 2019 by eduniversal. With three of the main criteria being the starting salaries after graduation, the program’s reputation among companies, and the level of satisfaction expressed by students, the ranking can be seen as a representation of recruiters. Furthermore, it has ranked 34th in the Times Higher Education’s global university employability ranking.

The program

The high quality of teaching due to practical insights, an international approach and its proximity to the sports industry define the main reason to strive for a degree at emlyon business school.

© emlyon

The MSc contains an advanced management education where students learn about international sports business & culture, social responsibility, marketing, accounting, business analytics, entrepreneurship and  management strategies.

Correspondingly, the program is designed to give students a skillset to understand the dynamics, benefits and challenges of management in the international sports business and develop outstanding knowledge to further shape the industry in the future.

An exchange semester in Shanghai and fieldtrips to the UK, French Alps and Germany guarantee a first-hand experience of other countries’ economies, resulting in an international understanding and knowledge of the business.

Application

The third round of applications for the program is open until the 30th of March. Applications run from November to August 2020. 

The requirements are:

  • Bachelor or Master Degree in any field
  • GMAT/GRE/TAGE MAGE/CAT Test Scores (optional)
  • English Proficiency Test Score (for non native English speakers) 

The selection of candidates happens in an overarching valuation, taking the entire potential, background and motivation of a candidate into account. 

For more detailed information, you can learn more about the program and application here.


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Studying esports: Bachelor programmes around Europe

Finding their way into everyday pop culture and innovative business models, esports has been facing an explosive growth from a small niche to a full grown industry with a $1.1B revenue in 2019 ¹. With "gaming" being recognized as professional sports and competitive industry, the need for graduates and professionals with fundamental knowledge of esports is evolving as well.

While there have been several programmes in the US for years, esports is finally also an upcoming matter for european schools, with Bachelor and Master degrees popping up in 2019 and 2020 in Germany, France, UK and Finland.

If this is a career path interesting for you, here's 9 schools where you can study esports.

Germany

Medienmanagement at HS Mittweida

Overview

  • Field of Study: Media Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Mittweida, Saxony, Germany
  • Duration: 3 years (6 semester)
  • Language: German

Content

The HS Mittweida is the first (and at the moment only) state school in Germany offering a possibility to study esports - not as a main course though. In Mittweida, students studying media management can deepen their studies at esports and game marketing from the third semester on.

In four semester, students learn the whole process of creating esports business models, with a main focus of the development process and marketing of games and events.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.me.hs-mittweida.de/studienangebote/informationen-fuer-bewerber/medienmanagement.html [DE]

esports Management at HAM (Hochschule für angewandtes Management)

Overview

  • Field of Study: Business Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Munich | Berlin | Dortmund | Hamburg | Vienna (Austria)
  • Duration: 3,5 years (7 semester)
  • Language: German

Content

Officially, the first school to offer an esports diploma in Germany, HAM created a esports business degree with practical orientation. The focal points of the program are:

  • esports event management
  • management of esports teams
  • esports marketing
  • digital innovation of gaming industry

The degree program is offered semi virtual, so it's split between online and on-site courses. That's a big advantage for the flexibility: Next to studying full time, HAM also offers the possibility to study in part time or as a dual study.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.fham.de/studiengaenge/bachelor/esports-management/ [DE]

esports & Game Management at Macromedia Fachhochschule

Overview

  • Field of Study: Media and Communication Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Munich | Cologne | Hamburg
  • Duration: 3,5 years (7 semester) incl. exchange semester
  • Language: German

Content

The degree course at Macromedia might be the most extensive one in regard of esports business principles in Germany. It targets students who would like to achieve a management position in esports, whether it's for leading game development, athletes or events.

The six main contents are:

  • empiric research & statistics
  • principles in sports communication & sports sciences
  • athletes management & sports marketing
  • principles in esports & games management
  • esports & games business
  • esports event management

Read more on the school's website: https://www.macromedia-fachhochschule.de/bachelor-studium/medienmanagement/esports-und-games-management.html [DE]

UK

The private education system in the UK is probably the perfect playground for students interested in digital & esports relative subjects. Financing themselves with higher tuition fees, the schools have the opportunity to provide high-end equipment which brings their courses to a next level in hindsight of practical insights into (gaming) soft- and hardware. If you can afford about 13.000£ for your diploma, we recommend taking a closer look at the following schools.

esports BA (Hons) at Staffordshire University

Overview

  • Field of Study: Business Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Stoke-on-Trent | London
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Language: English

Content

With subjects like Games Arts, Cultures and Design and a digital institute in London, the Staffordshire University has established itself as a "Games university" in the UK. Expanding their offer with a BA in esports was just the next logical step.

True to a hands-on approach, students will learn about the esports business in practical projects from hosting single & team player events and athlete management to a full marketing experience of broadcasting, video editing, content creation and analytics. For this, Staffordshire university is equipped with pro gamer training facilities, an esports arena, a control room with high-tech computers for editing, mixing and co.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.staffs.ac.uk/course/esports-ba

esports BA (Hons) at Chichester University

Overview

  • Field of Study: Business Management / Media Sciences
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Chichester, West Sussex
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Language: English

Content

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vN3U98SR68&

Summing it up in one sentence, the esports degree at Sheffield Hallam University teaches fundamental business and media skills for the esports industry for running events, managing teams and reporting on competitions.

The necessary skills and knowledge are transmitted via a mix of lectures, seminars, exercises and practical activities in their radio room, TV room and newsroom.

As a final project at the end of the programme students will work together with clients from the esports industry to host a live event.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.shu.ac.uk/courses/event-management/ba-honours-esports/full-time

esports BA (Hons) - Event Management at Sheffield Hallam University

Overview

  • Field of Study: Event Management & Media Training
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Sheffield, South Yorkshire
  • Duration: 3 - 4 years
  • Language: English

Content

Unlike other business management programmes, Chichester University has a more scientific approach in teaching about esports. While still taking a look at event production, promotion, sponsorship, game play and co, the courses are also built around sports science, psychology and ethics - transferable skills for other postgraduate studies or jobs in various industries.

However, the practical side is not being neglected either with skills development sessions for gamers, staging competitions and work placements.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.staffs.ac.uk/course/esports-ba

France

Specialising your studies on esports in France is only possible when attending a private school. Interesting enough, most, if not all of them, are a result of the partnership of the IONIS Group with XP, the international esport & gaming school.

XP, the international esport & gaming school

Overview

  • Field of Study: Business Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Arts
  • Where: Paris | Lille | Lyon | Bordeaux | Marseille | Rennes | Strasbourg
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Language: French

Content

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mBcuGQ9I0hY

The XP courses focuses deeply on event management & marketing. By starting with teaching the fundamentals of the esports industry, the students will quickly gain the insights to deepen their knowledge in practical projects. The main pillars of the XP program are:

  • Master the fundamentals
  • Consolidate knowledge to put it into practice
  • Master the skills and develop your own projects

After graduation, careers await in creating events and tournaments, digital marketing and community management.

Read more on the school's website: https://xp.school/Le-Programme/Cycle-Bachelor/ [FR]

esport & Gaming at ISEFAC Bachelor (IONOS Group)

Overview

  • Field of Study: Communication Management
  • Degree: Certifie par I'État Niveau II (Bachelor)
  • Where: Paris | Bordeaux | Lille | Lyon | Montpellier | Nantes | Nice
  • Duration: 3 years
  • Language: French

Content

A classic subject of communication & business management with a focus on the esports industry. The programme is a mix of communication, marketing and event management with basics in psychology, social sciences and accounting. Thus, the diploma at ISEFAC prepares you for jobs in the gaming sector in management, communication and event organisation.

Read more on the school's website: https://www.isefac-bachelor.fr/bachelor/esport-et-gaming/ [FR]

Finland

esports Business at KAMK University of Applied Sciences

Overview

  • Field of Study: Business Management
  • Degree: Bachelor of Business Administration
  • Where: Kajaani, Finland
  • Duration: 3,5 years
  • Language: English

Content

This course aims at giving an all-round insight into the operations of esports as a business. The focus of this degree lies on management and leadership, as well as event management and international operation.

A nice plus for Gamers is the university's aim of keeping their hobbies alive during their studies. For this purpose, Kajaani provides high-performance gaming computers at the campus to use by students outside of lesson times.

Read more on the university's website: https://www.kamk.fi/en/Applicants/International-Degrees/Bachelors-Degree-in-Esports-Business/c0b4b339-642a-43b5-a527-6fbbd7363de4


Sources:

1 https://www.businessinsider.com/esports-ecosystem-market-report?r=DE&IR=T


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What does it take to be a Flagship Shop Manager? An interview with David Brown from Timberland

There’s three things about working in retail that you can learn from David Brown:

  1. Managing a retail team only works when you see yourself as one of them
  2. The right attitude is more important than experience 
  3. Purpose in your career can influence your whole life

As General Manager of Timberland’s new Purpose-Led Flagship Store in Carnaby Street, London, David Brown is responsible for 241 square meter retail space and managing a team of 24 to ensure the smooth operation of the daily business. To maintain this, his management and interpersonal skills need to be over-the-top - and here’s why: A flagship store is the leading store of a brand. Even though the typical KPIs like sales or turnover do matter, the main focus of the flagship store is on drawing attention and visitors. Thus, transforming it into a showcase with an extraordinary shopping experience. 

On one hand, this is achieved through a special interior design and a wide range of products. On the other hand though, the realization happens thanks to a high-quality team which also act as ambassadors for their brand.

The store and its employees are so to speak a prototype of retail, making David an experienced and valuable interview partner to get an insight into the career of a Shop Manager. 

In this interview, we talked with David about his work at Timberland’s new Purpose-Led Flagship Store, his managing skills and - important enough - purpose. 

Dear Readers, please meet David Brown.

So, David, you’re managing quite a big team. 

I’ve got a team of approximately 24 at the moment. 4 of those are managers as well, so making sure that the  delegation is handed out to the right managers in order to keep a smooth running operation of the store. Everyone is working on specific job roles that are required to complete a regular working day.

And what makes your team stand out? How would you describe it?

It’s very important for it to be family-orientated, because if you’re spending up to 40 hours work with certain individuals. You’re probably spending more time with them than you’re at home. The family atmosphere is very important, because I am a great believer in leading by examples. Whatever I do, I would expect my team to be up to the same thing. So family atmosphere is important. 

Talking about leading by example - which example do you give?

I love to give the most basic. We all use the toilet. We clean the toilet. I will mob the floors, so it’s never going to be something that I expect my team to shy away from. Because I am part of the team. So that is my number one example, it keeps a clear message that I am prepared to do anything that I would also ask them to do as well.

That is quite important and they probably appreciate it a lot.

I think it’s important because gone are the days where managing staff exempts you from doing the same work as the team. I am very much a team player and that is how we get positives on the day. And ensuring that everyone is on the same page.

Does it create a community?

Well, right now we have a big community in the store. We go out and work alongside charity shops, getting involved with any events that are happening in the local community. My role then tends to bring that community spirit within the store. If you lead by example, the team pretty much follow suit with that. 

It’s also something Timberland represents, the community spirit that the brand lives in their sustainability projects.

We live and breath that. Last night I was in my local area where we are re-greening the area. The turnouts of 500 volunteers turned up yesterday. And they finished it up with a live gig from which again brought a lot of the community together, so we can reflect that with the store as well.

Jumping back to 2015: What was the motivation back then to apply for the role as Shop Manager at Timberland?

I felt that I needed a change. I have been with my previous employer of work for 15 years. I needed to take on a challenge, and knowing certain individuals that were happy in a - we call it a big peoples-company - it’s.. you’re not serving kids, you’re serving professionals, you’re serving individuals from multiple components of life. And that really interested me. My aim was to go to a company where customer service was customer service. Being a manager you had the autonomy to do things in the store and be able to see the benefits from the work. And that’s what Timberland really stood out for for me. Also, being part of VF Group. Understanding how big the corporation was... we could literally do anything.

So did you find the challenge and the purpose in your job at Timberland?

Timberland has really opened my eyes in terms of purpose and how we bring it directly to the stores where we are selling on a day to day basis. And how we connect purpose to the customer.

Purpose has allowed me to switch from driving a Diesel Car to an electric car. My emissions is zero. And I’ve looked at my household where we have caused a minimum at emissions. We recycle. Food, waste, cardboard, plastic. So that’s some of the things that really have been influenced by working for Timberland.

Just to make a quick excursion, I had an interview with Alicia Pinckney, Designer @Timberland, and she actually said something similar: That she found a purpose in her job and a change in her lifestyle when she started working for Timberland. Which I personally think is amazing as it is something a lot of people aim for.

It’s definitely been life-changing because you’re comfortable, because you can see what the company’s philosophy stands for, where they want to take it. If I give an example, theres not one down-feathered jacket in my store and we have some fairly big jackets. It’s all recyclable materials.  So in-sync with what I do at home, what I do when I’m coming to work, what I do at work, for me, it’s like a cycle, for me being as green as I possibly can and Timberland has definitely kickstarted that.

And do you think you influence Timberland in return as well?

Definitely. I am in a unique position being in a flagship store. You’re able to talk to various levels in the business. They definitely listen, because it’s important. And if you feel that you been listened to, it also inspires you to do more things and to feel good by it.

Looking back on your own experience, if you had to give advice on how to achieve a career at a Flagship Store, maybe even as a Shop Manager, especially for Retail or Sales experienced candidates who would like to reach the next level. What would you say which qualities are absolutely essential for your job?

I think you need to be very open-minded. You need to come to a company like Timberland knowing that the level expectation that is needed has to be grown from within. You’ve got to be prepared to make changes, be prepared to evaluate what you’ve learned previously and how you can have the right attitudes which is what’s going to be needed.  And once you have that, you’ve got the foundation. 

Do you think a Shop Manager should always have been working in retail before?

No. I certainly don’t. That’s qualities that you can also bring even without the retail experience. And still can make a big difference in the store. I think gone are the days where one has to have 100% retail experience. It’s the right attitude and what they can bring to the team or to the store. You’ve got to be open.

Always. And good with people probably.

Yes, definitely. 


The article grabbed your attention and you would like to join the Timberland team? All jobs from Timberland can be found at their company profile and the Timberland career portal.

Editor's Note: Timberland is part of VF, the the global company behind around 30 of the world’s leading sports, outdoor and lifestyle brands.
Timberland ®’s dedication to make quality products is bringing outdoor adventures within your city lifestyle. A global leader in premium-quality footwear, apparel and accessories that is equally committed to environmental and social responsibility

Webinar: Look behind the scenes of VF with professionals from Vans, Timberland & Co.

On two dates next week, VF Corporation gives students the option to participate in 5 webinars with business professionals from various departments of their different brands. Enabling a sneak-peek in what its like to work at VF.

„Students have the great opportunity to actually get to know different functions in very short and straight to the point webinars of half an hour each. If they are looking for some guidance on what field to focus on it is a great “orientation” opportunity as they can do one webinars or all of them! If they are already focusing on one function/career (ie. sales or digital) they can interact with a VF business leader!“

Gabriele Silva, Senior EMEA Talent Acquisation Manager, VF

If the sports and lifestyle industry does interest you, this is a great chance to find out more about the work behind the scenes of various roles in an international successful company. VF Corporation is a global leader in branded lifestyle apparel, footwear and accessories (to give you some facts: with 50,000 associates and $11.2 billion in revenue) and the company behind iconic lifestyle & outdoor brands, like The North Face, Timberland, Vans, Napapijri, Eastpak and many more.

While VF is highly diversified across brands, products, distribution channels and geographies, their One VF culture and approach to doing business provides a unique and powerful competitive advantage.

For a student or recent graduate this means they can start a career in a company that can allow them to move across different brands, functions and countries; this really enhances their learning opportunities! Finally, and most importantly, we are teams of inclusive and friendly people; who are ambitious and eager to keep learning.

Gabriele Silva, Senior EMEA Talent Acquisation Manager, VF

The Webinars

On the 3rd and 5th of December, you can join VF in their webinars online. Especially for students and graduates who consider a career at VF or one of its brands, it allows a first contact with the work and people behind VF - similar to a digital open-door-event.

Below we noted the schedule of both days including the times in CET (=UTC+1) for each speaker.

December 3rd:

  • 13.00-13.30 CET: Digital, with Andreas Olsson, Group Digital Accounts Director
  • 13.45-14.15 CET: Finance, with Elena Frattini, Business Analysis Manager Napapijri
  • 14.30-15.00 CET: Supply Chain & Operations, with Martijn Van Paradijs, Senior Manager Operations Vans

December 5th:

  • 9.30-10.00 CET: Sales & Marketing, with Edoardo Borgo, Sales Distributors Manager, APAC & EMEA, Eastpak
  • 10.15-10.45 CET: Sustainability, with Marianella Cervi, Sustainability & Responsibility Manager Timberland

How to take part

If there’s a webinar that catches your interest, you can easily register for it online. Under this link, you’ll find a registration form where you fill in your details and choose the webinars you’d like to participate in. The VF event team will then send you an e-mail with an invitation to join.


Find more information on the event and how to register here: https://www.jobteaser.com/en/events/57512-connect-with-vf-business-leaders-discover-more-about-your-future-career

How products come to life: An interview with Hermin Uzer from Napapijri

You might ask yourself: How exactly does a sketch from a Designer turn into a real product? As we just have a very general answer to this question ourselves, we passed it on to an expert in this field.
Hermin Uzer, Head of Product Development of Napapijri since 2011, translates design ideas and transforms them into three-dimensional products on a daily base, through all of the stages involved in developing outdoor apparel from concept to final product.

We were lucky to have her give us passionate insights into her work at Napapijri, shed some light on what exactly product development is (and what it is not) and after all, how it brings the brand to life.

Sportyjob: Let's jump right in. I have to admit I always found it difficult to really explain what Product Development actually is. Maybe you can help me and the readers get a better understanding of it. What exactly is it that you do at Napapijri?

Hermin Uzer: In a nutshell, product development is making the garments three-dimensional. You know, we make the garments real. There’s a lot that needs to be done, so where we start is basically when we get the briefing and the target from our merchandising team where they note the retail prices, the line architecture, what kind of innovations or carry-over-styles we need to consider. What the general direction is. It’s the same briefing that the designers get.
Based on that, we deliberate who the right vendor would be. And after that, we would get the initial sketches and ideation from the designers and we would work with the raw materials team to arrange all the components that are needed to make the product real.

SJ: So it’s basically the entire journey from the product. And if you would break it down how your department develops new products from scratch to market, how would you describe it?

We would start with the sketch from the designers and create a technical description for it. We then send the technical sketches to the vendor.
So, we make detail sheets, we scan sketches for construction and design features that we have to specify. This might be a very specific sleeve-construction, a specific fit or functionality that we need to take into consideration. It's really about every single detail. The color, the applications, prints, specific stitches. Maybe other features or handcrafts. Completely sketch out every single thing and component so that it's absolutely clear what the vendor needs to produce.

SJ: And after that?

HU: For the second step, we actually visit the vendor and together with them look at how the construction came out. Is it nice? Are there limitations? Do we have to make some adjustments? And directly in the factory, we work together with those vendors, making sure that the design is something that we can realize in the garment.

SJ: What's the biggest challenge about it?

HU: Our most intensive work is maintaining the design integrity within the possibilities that exist. So, coming back to what I said back earlier, the target that the merchandiser's define is a very important factor in product development, but keeping the design integrity is even more important. Because that, you know, that gives the wa-woomm and the life and the DNA to the brand!


The target that the merchandiser's define is a very important factor in product development, but keeping the design integrity is even more important. Because that, you know, that gives the wa-woom and the life and the DNA to the brand!

Hermin Uzer

HU: Anyway, that’s usually the part where we spend 80% work time on, going back and forth to the vendors, working on the washes, applications, the sizing, the construction, the workmanship, the pricing, the fabrics and everything. It’s a lot. It’s basically everything.
That’s why I said in a nutshell it’s making a design three dimensional. It’s not just going to the vendor and a sample comes out. It’s really working in translating the inspiration from the designer, but maintaining the KPI from the merchandiser in order for them to place it on the market.
After that, we would get a first product, we would have a review meeting with both merchandisers and the designers to get their feedback on the execution, on the color, on the intensity, on the price, etc. And usually, we construct a garment further until we get to a second prototype. And so on until the final product comes out.

SJ: A very extensive process.

HU: We also have to take into consideration the testing part on quality: this requires testing of the fabric and the components, but also full testing of the garment - do all features and benefits work in construction, such as seam-taping, or wash details, colour migration? Does the fabric work in combination with the excecution – pilling, snagging, and so on. To make sure we deliver an up to standard product to the consumer, we have to look at each and every aspect while developing.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZwQ7uOoWik
Hermin Uzer goes into further detail on how she develops products for Napapijri


SJ: It seems like Product Development and the Design process are very entwined. You studied Design yourself at the AMFI. Does it come in handy for your position?

HU: I would say yes and no. It’s very difficult. I mean I started out as a Designer indeed. However, at the time that I started, Design, Development, Coloring, being responsible for graphics and production, was all-in-one.
In that period of time, you know, as a Designer, we were obliged to go to the factories and take care of the realisation ourselves.
And I clearly remember the moment it had changed when some bigger corporations came to Holland - that is in my case, as I work in Amsterdam - there was a moment when I had a talk with a large international company and they asked me „Ok, you have to make a choice. It’s either design or either development.“ And I was like „What do you mean? Design and Development is one and the same." But in this company, Designer's were in charge of setting up and designing the collection, but the developers were responsible for the realization of the product. That’s when I decided, I'd rather go into the product development side, because realization for me is more important. Because you can have a beautiful sketch, but then the outcome might not be like you imagined.
So I wanted to be as close as possible to the design. However, when I look at some of people that I worked with in the past who have been in my team of developers, you know, most of them they are younger and they didn’t have any design experience, but they’re extremely good developers. I think if you have a combination of understanding creativity, even though it’s not your own design, and understanding the DNA of the company and the creativity of the Designer, being able to translate it into a construction so that you don’t change the styles too much - that’s the most important asset you can have as a developer.


If you have a combination of understanding creativity, even though it’s not your own design, and understanding the DNA of the company and the creativity of the Designer, being able to translate it into a construction so that you don’t change the styles too much - that’s the most important asset you can have as a developer.

Hermin Uzer

SJ: That's incredible! I need to admit that I’ve actually never really distinguished between Design and Product Develoment.

HU: Honestly, I think you shouldn’t. Over the last 25 years, it’s how the development went. I am happy to see that nowadays, especially with the upcoming of digital design, the new master studies at fashion schools turn their focus on creating styles digitally. I see the fusion of Design and Development come back more and more. Because those students are obliged to really understand construction, pattern making, fabrics, applications and everything, whereas there was a time when design was only focused on creativity. Realization was important, but not in depth. I see that coming back in the newer generations.

SJ: Yeah sure, it is really important that the Designer's have an understanding of the overall process.

Yes! It is! In my opinion, designers and developers do have different strengths, but they should actually know exactly the same. It’s like your left and right arm. And without one the other would not function.

SJ: Let's finish with a personal insight. What is your favorite part of being a product developer?

HU: It’s being in touch with the product. Even though it’s something that I don’t design, it is designed in my brand, so it’s also something from me. Just having the challenge to realize that design and enable the adaption from all sides, from quality, execution, targets and design integrity. That’s - it’s always nice! It becomes your little baby. You’re responsible from Step B onwards - but even without Step A, it’s your little baby.



Editor's Note: Napapijiri is part of VF, the the global company behind around 30 of the world’s leading sports, outdoor and lifestyle brands.
With a finnish name, the norwegian flag as a logo and found in Italy, Napapijri represents a global mindset through the intersection of boundaries, culture, nature and art. The brand portfolio includes Menswear, Womenswear and Childrenswear.

The advantages of working remotely in the sports business

While modern companies implemented remote work - even just for a day  per week - even years ago, the location-unbound working model is now becoming a big part of the every day work culture in the sports industry. 

One company in the sports business showing exactly how it is done is komoot. While located in Potsdam, the team is actually working from all over the world - remotely.

Right at this very moment, they look for a Brand Manager to expand their team.

This way, they’re actually developing a full functioning and effective team which takes responsibility and therefore, really pushes the company to the next level while being more satisfied in their job.

How so? That’s what we discovered in this blog. Find out what advantages working remotely brings and what it needs to make it work. 

The advantages of working remotely

Better work-life-balance

While most companies which offer remote work as a benefit do expect you to be available for a specific time frame matching the office hours, there’s still plenty which allow a flexible time schedule. Taking time off for necessary appointments and continuing work afterwards, starting earlier to have more time in the afternoon, or whichever model it is you prefer - you’ll be able to use your time more effectively and actually, coordinate your job around your life and not the other way round. A very exciting experience. 

And even if you need to work fixed hours, after all it allows you to spend more time outside of work. Taking into consideration the time employees are saving by not having to commute to work and back home, as well as the option to actually use your break for something else than having lunch in the canteen, it seems to enable a better use of time.

A focus on productivity instead of time

What happens when your daily task are done and your project is on hold? Well, let’s face it: A lot of office time is spent with browsing the web, socializing, figuring out where to go for holidays, you get the point. The reason is simply that we have to be there until a specific time when our shift ends, no matter the work load. While being idle in between tasks can push motivation, it can also be wasted time that you could put to much better use. 

That’s where remote work comes in handy. The advantage of working at home is that 

  1. you can actually concentrate on your work without having colleagues from your office interrupting 
  2. when your work is done, you can actually do something else because
  3. your boss can hardly stumble into the office noticing you’re procrastinating

We’re not implying that you should skip on your work for a layday at home and fool your team or boss. But if you’re doing your job quickly and still maintain good quality, there’s nothing wrong about using remaining working hours for other activities - as long as you’re available when needed.  This leads to more productive and effective work - so both sides, employee and employer, benefit from it. 

Creativity & innovation

In general, working from home might give you the needed distance from your work and team to be creative or innovative. Especially, when having the option to „work from wherever you want, be it a beach, the mountains, your house or anywhere else“ as komoot puts it in their job ad, the remote work gives you the freedom to explore new places, new cultures or even just the neighborhood in your daily life, to gain new experiences and impressions. Which - as we know - is fueling creativity. 

Cost savings 

Shifting to the employer’s point of view who does benefit from all mentioned points, they have furthermore the advantage of actually being able to save money. With more people working remotely, there’s less working space needed, which cuts the cost for rent, interior and maintainance. 

Happiness and passion

Taking all these things into account, it’s no surprise that surveys say that remote employees are all in all happier than regular office staff. It benefits their health, mental and physical, as well as giving them much needed freedom to fulfill dreams and goals. 

Disadvantages and how to avoid them

With our own Sportyjob team working remotely from everywhere between Germany to France and even to the Canary Islands, we know exactly that not working together takes a lot of effort to actually create a functioning team. While benefits for employees and employers are obvious, there are still disadvantages luring around the corner. Talking about miscommunication, feeling disconnected, projects lying dormant, unhappy team members - you name it.

But, like mentioned above, those issues can be easily handled with some effort and measurements that the whole team needs to take.

Communication

When being in the same office or building, it’s easy just to give a short update in between. But even in regular working environments, there’s a need for individual weekly jour-fixes and team meetings to keep the team updated. Even with some distance between the team, it’s absolutely necessary to maintain this. Giving updates on what you’re working on, project status, etc., even some personal information every now and then (planned holidays, how everyone is doing, etc.).

The most important part though is remembering that there’s is no digital, but actually a human team existing. For this, video calls are the easiest way to continuing talking face to face over any distance. With plenty of tools which allow split screens and group calls, there’s no problem to keep up with the communication.

komoot even took it a step further: 4 times a year, the whole team meets up at one destination around the world for one week, to work together, socialize, get to know each other in case there are new team members aboard. A perfect way of combining a team building measurement with an activity which resembles perfectly to company spirit and mission. 

Trust 

A very big factor. Remote jobs only work when both sides trust each other. If there’s colleagues or your employer mistrusting your work ethics, this is not going to work out. There might always be someone who thinks that remote workers only relax, play games or chat or watch tv instead of working, but in our experience, this is far away from the truth. Whether you prefer working regular office hours or like to use your mornings for sports or other activities and therefore, work late - that’s fine. It should be accepted and most of all, trusted, by your team that you still keep up with your work. 

Also, on the other side of the medal, trust in being seen. Don’t worry about being available all day long in case your boss actually sends an e-mail when you have just finished your day. There’s the possibility that you might feel the urge to always check your e-mails, always be online, so no one gets the idea of you being lazy. There’s absolutely no need to. Trust is needed on both sides. So is free time to stay productive and passionate about your job. 


If you’re interesting in knowing more about the realization of komoots working model, check out the free Whitepaper from our partner ISPO: Digital talents in the sports industry - Whitepaper.

By looking at komoot, they derive concrete recommendations for winning digital talents for the sports industry.

Meet Alicia Pinckney: Designer at Timberland

Timberland Designer Alicia Pinckney

Passionate, creative and a very contagious smile: That's Alicia Pinckney. The Men's Apparel Designer of Timberland heritage talked to us about her career, what inspires her and the possibilities for sustainable solutions of sports fashion design.

Sportyjob: I've seen you had your 2 years anniversary these days. Congratulations!

Alicia Pinckney: [laughs] Thank you!

SJ: So, how have your last two years at Timberland been?

AP: I feel like these last two years have gone by so quickly! I've joined the team together with a bunch of new people, so in a sense, we kind of build the brand up again with a completely new team. With that in mind, there has been a lot of evolution, a lot of structure changes, just a lot of things happening in these last two years. So I think that’s what made it go by really fast! I’ve just been keeping up with everything that has been going on. I like fast pace and that’s what Timberland has been. It’s always been open for change and constantly evolving to something new. So it has been a very interesting time in my two years here, meeting different people, traveling to different places around the world.

SJ: Is it something that sparks your creativity, going so fast pace?

AP: I definitely think it is! Because for me, if I feel like I am stagnated or anything isn’t happening, my creativity can lie dormant. But if you have something that is stimulating you, like going to new places, being exposed to new cultures, that keeps the creativity and juices flowing. Whenever we design for a new season, we are always traveling - I can say that it definitely helps with the creativity.


If I feel like I am stagnated or anything isn’t happening, my creativity can lie dormant. But if you have something that is stimulating you, like going to new places, being exposed to new cultures, that keeps the creativity and juices flowing

Alicia Pinckney

SJ: Let's go back two years. Do you remember your first product that came to store?

AP: Yeah, actually! When I first joined the team in July 2017, I immediately started working on a collaboration project with Christopher Raeburn. Then, around June 2018, it was presented at the London Fashion Week. It was our first time having a Timberland product on a runway during fashion week. So that was something! I was like: "Wow, I just started and I already see my stuff!". Normally, when you start at a company, it takes a while to actually see your designs in action, because of the timelines we are working on.
Another few months later I saw it in our Flagship Store in London in Regent Street, which was very cool and very exciting! And when I went back home to America, I went into the New York store and I saw that we had a popup store based on showing this product, because this project was so significant for sustainability. You see, Christopher Raeburn is all about reuse, reduce, recycle and circular design. And our product was basically that. We made sure that all of our cotton that we used was organic, any part that is possible can be recycled. It was basically like a very closed circular collection. The intent was reducing waste and making use of waste, everything we used from very sustainable resources.

SJ: Talking about sustainability. Timberland has been doing a lot to reduce the carbon foot print of the fashion industry. One of their goals is to reuse 100% recycled materials until 2020. What is your role in reaching these goals?

AP: We’ve been training a lot on circular design. I am not sure if you’re familiar with that. You look at design in general, normally it’s very linear, we pick up a resource, we use it and then it’s wasted. And no one does anything with the waste. But the concept of circular design does. You start with the resources, make fabric from it which - after the consumer uses it - can be remade into something else and can go back to the beginning loop of the resources. It can be regenerated for something else. So, we should eliminate our carbon foot print, not have so much waste. A lot of our decision making also depends on: ok it can be repaired, so the customer doesn’t have to throw it away. Which is a big factor. Or we also can choose things that are already recycled, for example, companies using recycled nets from the ocean. It’s about doing the research, to take waste and making something out of it.  So it’s a lot of thinking what we’re doing and honestly, out of all the big companies that I’ve worked for, Timberland is the most aware in the details to help reduce our carbon footprint.

SJ: How does sustainability influence your designs?

AP: I feel that it influences my way of designing in the way that when people think of me as a designer or like when you think of the idea of any designer, you automatically think of fashion, trends, that’s it. But for me, I think, having this whole topic of sustainability in the forefront of my mind, I am not just chasing after fashion. I am chasing after what makes a change for the world. I know it sounds a bit cliché, but if you only stay relevant with what’s happening in trends, honestly, a lot of trends aren’t that great for the environment. So, it really changes my way of designing, because I am not really trend and fashion focused, I am more purpose and function focused.


I am not just chasing after fashion. I am chasing after what makes a change for the world

Alicia Pinckney

SJ: So, you don’t only have an impact on Timberland's design, but it also has one on you!

AP: Yeah, I can definitely agree with that. It feels like it gives you a sense of purpose. Because I feel that when you’re designing with not having anything in mind other than creating a garment that someone looks nice in, you kind of feel - I don’t know about anyone else, but for me - I kind of feel empty. Because this is what I am contributing to the world, that is my purpose.
When you look at the DNA of Timberland and the fact that we’re trying to do good for the world, while we also do this creative part of designing, you can feel a bit a balance of your fulfillment. Because you’re doing creative stuff, but you’re also doing something that is going to actually make a difference. Instead of just filtering the world or just oversaturating the world with garments, garments, garments, we’re trying to make a difference. Because of course, garments will always be a part of our life here, but if you can do it in a way you’re not killing the world, you feel a sense of purpose, of personal purpose.

SJ: Finding this fulfillment as an employee must be extraordinary for you, because before you were freelancing, you had your own brand GLEON 1938. It probably must have been a big change when switching from your own products to representing a brand. How is it different when working for a brand than doing your own products?

AP: I think it’s completely different as you are working collaboratively. Everything is build off of a team, from the initial ideation of the direction for the season to working with different partners to help to complete the collection. Whereas when I was working on my brand, I did everything on my own. I cut and sewed, and created my own patterns. I was connecting with different creatives, from my photographers to models and event creators for whenever I did fashion shows. At Timberland, we're involving another community of manpower to help get the brand globally reached.
But what I definitely think is the difference when you’re working for a brand is, not only do you have the financial support, but you can actually make a global statement when it comes to being sustainable.
But I really think you can take your ideas and your mindset from working  on your personal brand and bring the two at a larger scale when you’re working collaboratively with other designers. You can really see how it can become something big.

SJ: Would you say your old designs have become a part of your new work as well?

AP: I can definitely say that. For me, I have always been into function, as I mentioned before. Growing up, I have always been into maths and science. I was really into engineering throughout high school. And when I decided to pursue fashion design, it was another way to let out my creative side. So when I was designing personally for my brand,  I did a lot of things that required a lot of function. So, for me, I used that same way of thinking coming from Timberland. Whenever we design something, we always design with a purpose. Whenever we present something, we can’t just say „Oh I did this pocket, because it looks nice“. We have to have a true reason why we did it. Especially, for me working off of the heritage of Timberland, we defined our customer and our customer loves function. Our customer goes outside a lot. so, you know we need to be able to equip them with anything they'll need, whether it’s multiple pockets or a reversibility or whatever. Every detail that he can use when he’s outside. so for me, I was able to translate my functional way of thinking to Timberland.

SJ: Looking back, what is your favorite part of being a fashion designer?

AP: I have so many favorite parts of being a fashion designer  [laughs]. First, I would say the traveling is one of my favorite parts, because I love to travel and I am really really excited and grateful to have a job that allows me to travel. Seeing different cultures, seeing different things that help inform your collections.
The second thing I can say is when you actually get the garment, because you spend so much time sketching in 2D or sketching on the computer and then when you actually receive the garment that feeling to see it is just like „wow amazing!“. To see it transform from paper to an actual product is a very... it’s kind of like a confirmation.

SJ: Hearing this, you’re very passionate about your job. Which is great! You’d probably recommend becoming a designer.

AP: Yeah, I do!

SJ: If you would have to advice someone who wants to become a designer, which advice would you give him or her on how to achieve this career?

AP: I would definitely say, to surround yourself with people who you aspire to be. Getting to know other people that are designers. To ask questions. That way you can, you know, get advice from them. Also, be open to learn on your own. Do a lot of research. Like for me, I have always done a lot of research, I learned how to sew when I was 12. That was kind of a self-taught process. So when you’re open to researching, problem solving, anything like that that can really help you and boost you to becoming a designer.

Self-Taught Designer: All garments designed, cut and sewn by Alicia Pinckney for Vogue Italia's Call for Talents IV where she scored a scholarship for the Domus Academy's Master Fashion Design - © Vogue Italia

SJ: Did you already know that you want to be a designer when you were 12?

AP: Yes!!! I know, it’s so crazy. As i mentioned before I was really smart in school, like i was the valedictorian and the president of my class. I was really smart, I was like the mathlete nerd kind of girl. But at the same time, my family is filled with a lot of creativity. My mother works a lot with wood and my grandfather used to build with wood, too, he was a carpenter and a painter. And for me, just being surrounded by that as a kid was always something I also wanted to do. So I used to sketch all the time! I got my first sewing machine when I was 12. And from there, I used to make a lot of things, I made my prom dresses when I was in high school. So for me this was always a part of who I was, I’ve always known I wanted to be a designer since I was very young. And i just took the path to follow to get me to where I am now.

How to make your job search more effective

Whether you want to change companies or start in a new field: If you decide to land a new career outside of your network, you are dependent on external sources. The plenty of ads in newspapers to the world-wide web, ranging from social media platforms to job boards and company pages, might prevent us from seeing the wood for the trees. Thus, making the job search quite overwhelming when we get lost in the flood of options.
Luckily, there exist some methods to help you find your way through.

Here’s our advice on making your job search more effective.

Narrow the job down as much as possible

No matter which task in your life you look at: You always need to start with a plan of what you want to achieve to be successful. In this case, the start is knowing

  • what kind of job you are looking for
  • which industry fits your lifestyle & interest
  • where you want to work (anywhere / countrywide / region / city)
  • what kind of company (enterprise / middle-class / small business / start-up / agency)

Knowing exactly which career suits your needs, helps you target the right job.

The easy way would be already working in a field that you like. Job changes here mostly result from unhappiness with the employer, moving to a new region, the desire for a new challenge or a better salary. To make long story short: If you already have work experience in a career that you like, you can look for a similar position in a different company.

If you actually don’t have a clue, focus on your skills, education and interest to narrow it down on a specific field, for example Marketing, Management or Engineering. Most online job boards allow you to filter for a department, so that’s a start.

Specify your search

If you are able to narrow your interest down on an industry, concentrate your search on a niche job-board. For example, if you are looking for an employment in the sports industry, it’ll be more effective looking at less ads at Sportyjob than looking at thousands of ads on general job boards. In the end, your employer is as important for a satisfying work life as the mission field itself.

Same goes for regional offers: If you’d like to work in your home town, you might want to browse your regional newspaper first. Especially traditional & small business tend to advertise there. Nowadays, most newspapers also publish their jobs in their own online portal, so you can easily take a look on your phone or computer.

Let automation do your work

Job Alerts

Have you heard of alerts? It helps you automate your search. Just like a notification of your favorite mobile apps, these alarm you when a new ad was published that suits your search.

Just take a look at our own job alert:
Since you have narrowed down the job profile in the beginning of your search, you can easily automate your search. You define the

  • job description or field
  • keywords (i.e. specific skills, tools, buzz words like „small team“)
  • location
  • frequency (when the job is published / a summary once per day, week, …)

Once set up you will receive an e-mail in your defined frequency which contains all fitting positions. Let us do the work for you!

Pre-sets: Preparation is key

Another automated process is the application itself. A good job board offers the setup of a digital CV or upload of a document which allows you to apply with just one click the moment you found a fitting ad.
Take your time in advance to create a well-formatted CV - it will save you the time later and actually increase your effectiveness the most.

An alternative would be an extensive LinkedIn profile. A lot of companies extended their recruitment to the social media platform where you can apply directly. Furthermore, LinkedIn has a feature to print your CV out of your online profile.

Need advice on the perfect CV? Here's some thoughts for your CV of professional headhunter Andy Gugenheimer for help.

Looking manually

Make a schedule

Actively looking for a job is time-consuming and can be quite a pain-in-the-ass. It’s actually very similar to learning something new or growing a new habit. The key to being more effective is consistency. Scheduling a time slot for your job search daily or at least, regularly, increases your productivity and also makes the search itself less tiring. Create a weekly schedule which defines a time frame for your search. Also: If you decide on an hour daily, stick to it - but also don’t overrun.

Set goals: Job search +

The other half of actually making progress is defining goals that you want to achieve. Else, your job search will quickly turn intro scrolling through websites and wasting time. Define your task as „job search +“:
1 hour of job search = 30 minutes of research + filling out x application(s)

Activate your personal network

Let your friends and acquaintances know that you’re looking for a job. There’s a reason that collective intelligence exists - have it work for your advantage. They might have heard about an offer in their own company that suits your needs. Especially for jobs on the hidden labor market, this is absolute gold! Often, employer try to fill a position internally, so it won’t be published outside of the company. Knowing of one of those through a friend will enable you to send an unsolicited application.

Big plus: There won’t be many applicants and you will stand out as a proactive and motivated candidate.

We know the job search can be tough and the application and interview process afterwards entails another set of barriers to break down. But: With these hints, at least the first steps to achieve a new career, will be made a lot easier and more productive. We wish you good luck!

OutDoor Vs. Outdoor: What’s up with the two fairs?

OutDoor becomes OutDoor by ISPO, from 30.06. - 03.07.2019 for the first time.
In June 2018, the European OutDoor Group, EOG for short, announced that the OutDoor trade fair will be hosted by ISPO at Messe Munich for the next three years. With a new concept, the ISPO takes over the execution of the fair - and leads it into the future.

After the Messe Friedrichshafen lost the most important European outdoor fair to Munich, it calls a new event into action. The name? Outdoor.

Self-explanatory, two fairs coming around this year are creating a lot of confusion.  Let's take a closer look at OutDoor by ISPO and Outdoor.

OutDoor by ISPO

With a captivating concept, Messe München was awarded the contract by the EOG. Instead of simply adopting the Outdoor brand, ISPO expanded the event with innovative features - by looking at future-oriented technologies and other industries.

"The new concept takes up current requirements and offers added value for all market participants: whether start-up, medium-sized companies or global brands," says Markus Hefter, project manager of OutDoor by ISPO.

The most important developments at a glance:

An additonal 361 days

As part of ISPO, OutDoor is experiencing the same benefits that have already become established in the sports industry. Rather than being "just" an on-site event, OutDoor by ISPO creates a allround network with additional online and offline services, as well as connecting dealers and manufacturers 365 days a year.

Following the development of the outdoor  term
While the classic mountaineering, climbing and hiking activities will continue to be on the show, in 2019 additional segments will be added for the first time. Including yoga, running, trail running, mountain biking, travel and water sports.
For customers, those activities have already been an established part of the outdoor industry.

Knowledge transfer from the ISPO portfolio
With the help of its own portfolio and products, OutDoor by ISPO provides access to knowledge of other industries, through so-called "cross-industry". At Summits and Conferences, selected speakers will discuss environmental technologies already used in the sports industry, as well as digital trading and technology solutions from the experience with ISPO Digitize.

For small and medium businesses

Even though the trade fair in Friedrichshafen used to address the major players in the industry, ISPO now knows how to get start-ups and smaller companies on board. While "OutDoor Easy" enables a cost-effective trade show appearance, the Basecamp of Inspiration provides a platform for startups and industry news in particular, with its own summit on thoughts and visions.

The other fair: The new outdoor in Friedrichshafen

Even though the brand itself has moved, Messe Friedrichshafen is still trying to position itself as a key platform in the outdoor industry in 2019. How? By organizing its own trade fair.

Reduced to 2 1/2 instead of 4 days, the "Outdoor" takes place in Friedrichshafen from 17. - 19.09.2019.

For the industry itself, the challenge of Friedrichshafen is a rather confusing topic: Especially small and medium-sized companies usually opt for the stand placement on just one trade fair. Trade visitors are now faced with the decision to make: Munich or Friedrichshafen.

What's the advantages for Friedrichshafen?

According to Reisinger, the head of Outdoor, the new concept is mainly about using the existing strengthsof its location and eradicating the weaknesses of the original brand. Among other things, this shall be done by addressing small and medium-sized businesses through training and a start-up stage. A cost-effective stand package. Better networking options, such as round tables and organized conversations. A closer look at trends.

Developments that are also fundamental in the new concept of the OutDoor by ISPO. fully supported by the EOG. Thus, the original weaknesses of the brand are actually no longer an issue.

The future will show if an additional Outdoor in Friedrichshafen actually makes sense for the sector itself. In the first place, both platforms definitely promise an enhanced and exciting outdoor trade fair.

When art meets science: The industry of sports fashion

Do you know the two most successful sports brands in 2019? It's adidas and Nike.
That doesn't come as a big suprise as apart from sporty gear, both of them make in fashion. And not the casual apparel kind of way.

In February 2019, adidas Originals introduced their new collaboration with korean Designer Ji Won Choi at no other place but the London Fashion Week. Following in April, Beyoncé and adidas announced that they intend to collaborate in the creation of a new footwear and apparel line that would focus on performance and lifestyle items.

Taking a closer look at the fashion market this makes a lot of sense. While the sports & outdoor segment itself is booming and created revenue of 84,105 million USD¹ in 2019 already, the fashion segment actually amounted to 600,994 million USD² - which is seven times as much. Concentrating on fashion is almost a guarantee for success. And widening the own product range from sportswear to actual lifestyle is a smart move by adidas.

The demand is growing, with people doing more sports and actually concentrating on good-fitting and looking apparel which also supports them right during their workout. And of course, by sports brands being a big part of modern streetstyles and even evolving to designer fashion.

As a consequence, the sports industry offers a wide range of job opportunities for fashion designers - and engineers. Having the demand to be functional and fashionable creates a job profile which differs a lot from fashion designers in other sectors.

Sports Fashion Designer: Creativity & Sciene go hand in hand

Even though it's often associated with "artsy and creative" people, especially nowadays, creativity and a good style are simply not everything to be good in this job.

Sportswear Design is a melting pot of creativity, science, socioeconomics and engineering.

A career in fashion requires an understanding of technologies, a grasp of math and engineering, or the so called STEM skills (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics).

As fashionable looks enqueue behind performance orientation, the design process focuses on developing innovative ways to improve the fitness apparel, be it through special garments, treatment or production. For example:

  • adidas running shoes are a made of materials created through a technology called Digital Light Synthesis, which makes them lighter and at the same time more durable. It's a step further than 3D printing.
  • The garment of the workout wear from Patagonia is treated with Polygiene® odor control. It's based on (recycled) silver chloride which blocks the bacteria in the sweat.
  • And do you know how the fitting is perfectionized? Not through a designer taking measurements of different bodytypes, but by an alogorithm working on collected athlete feedback and digital data. A good example is the Flyknit Sportsbra by Nike. To ensure maximum comfort even for high-performance athletes, the team put in more than 600 hours of intense biometric testing, including motion capture and creating atlas maps.

Of course, the process is not completed by omniscient design-mathematics, but regularly it's a team of engineers and designeres who work hand in hand. Whichever field of work interests you more or fits your profile better, still, an understanding of the work of the other side helps a lot.

If you want to be a designer

You will need the technical skills, actually handcrafts and design software. It's concerning designing and crafting as well as pattern creation and garment construction. Furthermore, a good designer has knowledge about fashion, whether it's its history or the economic side of it.

Also, which might be the trickiest part, designing requires creativity and dedication, as well as a vision and talent. Maybe the hardest assets of them all.

Normally, the technical skills and background are both taught in fashion schools. Further depth, especially of fitness apparel can be gained in internships at the different brands.

Designer Jobs in the Sports Market

If you are a Designer looking for a new challenge in the sports business or want to become one by starting with an internships or a career-entry position, at Sportyjob you will find interesting jobs from Footwear, Garment and Sportsgear Designer to Fabrics Manager:

[jobs per_page="5" categories="design"]

1 https://www.statista.com/outlook/259/100/sports-outdoor/worldwide

2 https://www.statista.com/outlook/244/100/fashion/worldwide

© Title photo by adidas